• Tomáš Lanča
  • ustav
  • 25.03.2022
  • Institute of Physics in Opava

Total solar eclipse over the Antarctic

On December 4, 2021, the only total solar eclipse of the year occurred (next total solar eclipse will occur in april 2023). This time, the total eclipse belt passed through practically the least accessible area in the world - on the sixth continent, Antarctica. Petr Horálek from the Institute of Physics in Opava decided to go there and took several interesting photographs and recordings for the documentary work of students of the Multimedia Techniques of the Faculty of Medicine in Opava during the expedition. Now we bring you an interview with Petr Horálek, filmed shortly after his return to Europe, as well as resulting photography pictures of solar eclipse.
  • Tomáš Lanča
  • ustav
  • 25.03.2022
  • Institute of Physics in Opava

Black holes are the future giant source of energy, claims Opava astrophysicists

Maybe futuristic, but physically realistic: Supermassive black holes located in the center of galaxies might be the largest reservoirs of pure energy in the universe. As is well known, even light can't escape from the black holes themselves, but what could be extracted in the immediate vicinity of these extremely massive cosmic objects is their rotational energy. Astrophysicists from the Institute of Physics of the Silesian University in Opava - Martin Kološ, Arman Tursunov and Zdeněk Stuchlík, focused on this potential possibility of extracting energy from black holes in their scientific research.
  • Tomáš Lanča
  • ustav
  • 01.03.2022
  • Institute of Physics in Opava

The "WHOO!" Telescope located in Opava helps to solve the mysteries of stellar physics. After Loosening Anti-Epidemic Measures, it will again be open to the public.

Since 2016, the Silesian University has been operating the WHOO! (White Hole Obrervatory Opava) telescope, which has served several students since the beginning of its operation on important final theses in the field of astronomy and astrophysics. The observatory is even involved in cooperation with ESA and NASA. Besides the scientific research activities, the telescope is also usable for routine astronomical observations and is expected to offer observations of night sky objects to the general public twice a month after further stages of loosening.
  • Tomáš Lanča
  • ustav
  • 01.03.2022
  • Institute of Physics in Opava

Opava physicists study how to protect humankind from dangerous radiation of black holes and use it to our advantage

Supermassive black holes can be a good servant, but also a very evil lord for possible civilizations throughout the Galaxy. A new study by Opava physicists’ points to three types of energy production in the vicinity of black holes, ie three variants of the so-called Penrose process. Huge amounts of energy could be extracted from these processes in the future; however, the same processes can lead to the fatal escape of strong radiation and endanger the lives of any galaxy. Thus, physicists from Opava are studying not only the possibilities of using this gigantic source of energy, but also how to detect a possible energy leak and protect civilization.
  • Tomáš Lanča
  • ustav
  • 01.03.2022
  • Institute of Physics in Opava

The prestigious Astronomy Picture of the Day from August 9 has Slovak-Czech authors

On Monday, August 9, 2021, NASA published an image called "Perseus and Lost Meteors". Its authors are the Slovak astrophotographer and astronomer popularizer Tomáš Slovinský and the Czech astrophotographer Petr Horálek from the Institute of Physics in Opava. The unusual composite image, which took both authors hundreds of hours of work, draws attention to the oncoming maximum of the annual meteor shower Perseida and the problem of light pollution, which makes the meteor swarm increasingly difficult to observe.
  • Tomáš Lanča
  • ustav
  • 15.12.2021
  • Institute of Physics in Opava

The institute of Physics has two new Doctors of Science!

On the 7th of December 2021, Mgr. Kateřina Klimovičová Ph.D. and Mgr. Gabriela Urbancová Ph.D. successfully defended their doctoral dissertations, Congratulations!
  • Debora Lančová
  • ustav
  • 05.12.2021
  • Institute of Physics in Opava

Solar Eclipse over Antarctica chosen as NASA’s Astronomy Picture of the Day (APOD)

There was a total Solar eclipse on Saturday, December 4th, 2021, the only one this year and the only until April 2023. The total eclipse was visible only from the farthest end of the world – in Antarctica.
  • Tomáš Lanča
  • ustav
  • 02.08.2021
  • Institute of Physics in Opava

Photographer from the Institute of Physics succeeds in NASA APOD yet again

On Saturday the 31st of July, the American NASA institute published the photo “Remembering NEOWISE” by Petr Horálek from the Institute of Physics as a prestigious astronomy photo of the day. The photo recalls the flyby of the comet C/2020 F3 NEOWISE. The comet was shining bright in the morning and later in the evening sky during July of last year and was the brightest comet on the northern hemisphere’s night sky of the last 23 years. Thanks to the flyby happening “inside” of the Big Dipper constellation and the pandemic of COVID-19 that caused people to pay more attention to nature and space, the comet ended up being one of the most photographed space bodies ever.
  • Tomáš Lanča
  • ustav
  • 28.05.2021
  • Institute of Physics in Opava

Help us looking for dark matter with just your phone!

The international project CREDO (Cosmic-Ray Extremely Distributed Observatory) has been running since the end of August 2016, and the scientists from the Institude of physics in Opava also take part in its implementation. The project is focused on the detection of cosmic rays and the search for a mysterious „hidden substance“ (or also „dark matter“) in the universe. Unraveling its mystery could be within reach with the help of widest public. All you need is one app on your smartphone that can detect the volatile particles that accompany the hidden substance.
  • Tomáš Lanča
  • ustav
  • 17.05.2021
  • Institute of Physics in Opava

Lyrids meteor shower culminates on Thursday and Friday. They will be followed by a "supermoon""

On Thursday 22nd and Friday 23rd April, in the early morning, it will be possible to watch the most meteors from the annual meteor shower in Lyrida. These popularly called "shooting stars" are in the Earth's atmosphere caused by the extinction of ice-dust particles released from the core of Comet C / 1861 G1 (Thatcher). During the maximum, 10-15 meteors can be seen in the dark sky far from large cities and harmful light pollution, always in the early morning hours before dawn. Less than a week later, we are also waiting for one of the two angularly largest full moons of the year.